Why PEER

Make your grid a top performer.

Measure your performance with PEER scorecards. Participate in a continuous improvement process to maximize returns, minimize risk and achieve resiliency.


Bring sustainable, reliable power to the whole value chain.

Use PEER to drive value for all stakeholders — customers, businesses, cities, and states. Define key performance metrics and verify outcomes. Identify waste and performance gaps.


Be recognized as an industry leader.

Build trust, credibility, customer satisfaction and savings with PEER certification.

How PEER works

PEER, or Performance Excellence in Electricity Renewal, is built around 68 credits grouped into four overarching categories:

Reliability and resilience
Reliability & resilience
Operational effectiveness
Operational effectiveness
Energy efficiency and environment
Energy efficiency & environment
Customer contribution
Customer contribution

Projects achieve certification when they meet all prerequisite credits, plus a combination of core and bonus credits.

Explore the PEER Credit Library

PEER certification

PEER assessment is the first step toward certification. It’s an independent evaluation of overall power system performance, opening the door to identifying new opportunities for improvement and developing a plan for PEER certification. View the PEER Assessment Overview.

PEER participation includes all of the tools and resources needed in pursuing certification, plus access to a dedicated PEER coach. View the PEER Guide to Participation.

Apply for PEER

PEER offers three types of project applications:

City Project
City scale project that is typically a public project with a large variety of customers. Projects include municipal utilities, special districts within a city, or citywide projects within an IOU territory.
Campus Project
Typically, these are privately owned or operated projects that have just one or a few customers, but large enough to include distribution to multiple buildings and loads. Examples include college campuses, industrial parks and facilities, military bases, and large buildings.
Supply Project
Typically, these are privately owned or operated projects that supply locally generated power to downstream customers or loads. These projects usually have just a few customers or customer connection points and do not have control over the distribution system or the customer. Examples include CHP power plants for industrial facilities and third party suppliers for city and campus projects.

City Project
City scale project that is typically a public project with a large number of different customers. Projects include municipal utilities, special districts within a city, or citywide projects within an IOU territory.


Campus Project
Typically, these are privately owned or operated projects with just one or a few customers, but large enough to include distribution to multiple buildings and loads. Examples include college campuses, industrial parks and facilities, military bases, and large buildings.


Supply Project
Typically, these are privately owned or operated projects that supply locally generated power to downstream customers or loads. These projects usually have a just a few customers or customer connection points and do not have control over the distribution system or the customer. Examples include CHP power plants for industrial facilities, and third party suppliers for city and campus projects.

Begin working on a PEER project